Winners and Judges

2013 Competition

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ruel Johnson

Second Prize: Lesley-Ann Wanliss

Poetry:

First Prize: Vladimir Lucien

Second Prize: Ruel Johnson

Judges:

Short Fiction: Caryl Phillips, Olive Senior, Jan Lowe Shinebourne

Poetry: Easton Lee, Paul Keens-Douglas, Pam Mordecal

Past Winners and Judges

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Sharon Millar

Second Prize: Alexia Arthurs

Poetry:

First Prize: Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné

Second Prize: Lynn Sweeting

Judges:

Short Fiction: Thomas Glave, Oonya Kempadoo, Elizabeth Nunez

Poetry: Kendel Hippolyte, Mervyn Morris, Opal Palmer Adisa

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Barbara Jenkins

Second Prize: Heidi N. Holder

Poetry (two first place winners):

First Prize: Sonia Farmer and Danielle McShine

Judges:

Short Fiction: Erna Brodber, Zee Edgell, and Robert Antoni

Poetry: Fred D'Aguiar, Cyril Dabydeen, and Shara McCallum

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Stephen Narain

Second Prize: Andrea Shaw

Poetry:

First Prize: Lauren Alleyne
Second Prize: Ishion Hutchinson

 

Judges:

Short Fiction:Merle Hodge, Marlon James, and Shani Mootoo

Poetry: Kwame Dawes, Ramabai Espinet, and Kei Miller

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ashley Rousseau

Second Prize: Alake Pilgrim

Poetry:

First Prize: Monica Minott

Second Prize: Tanya Shirley

Judges:

Short Fiction: Garfield Ellis, Geoffrey Philp, and Merle Collins.

Poetry: Edward Baugh, Lorna Goodison, and Mark McWatt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviews

Archive for the ‘Joy Gleason Carew’ Category

Black Midas in Moscow

Friday, 16 December 2011

Conversations with Jan Carew

Joy Gleason Carew

Guyanese author Jan Carew is best known for his 1958 novel Black Midas. In 1964, Carew also published one of his most controversial books, Moscow Is Not My Mecca (US edition, Green Winter [1965]). And, as he learned much later, an unauthorized version of his book was circulated around the African continent as an “English language reader.” Carew’s novel was based on the stories of his cousin and other students from the Caribbean and Africa who had accepted scholarships to study in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Carew also drew on his own experiences as one of the first students from the English-speaking Caribbean to receive a scholarship to the Eastern Bloc countries when he went to Czechoslovakia in the early 1950s; and later, when he made two visits to the Soviet Union in the 1960s as a guest of the Soviet Writers’ Union. Following the publication of Moscow Is Not My Mecca, Carew was challenged by the Left and lauded by the Right, as each side tried to interpret his work from their often dogmatic and simplistic formulations. Carew, on the other hand, was exploring a complex set of relationships, which did not and still do not lend themselves to simple either/or divisions. Recognizing the potential of the Soviet experiment to provide much-needed support for the newly developing societies, Carew also felt he had a right to critique problems as he saw them and to call for reform.

Jan Carew is now ninety-one and in the process of writing his memoirs. This interview, conducted in Louisville, Kentucky, in July 2011, recounts aspects of his experiences as a student in Prague and, later, as a visitor to the Soviet Union, and his rising concern about the treatment of black students there. (more…)