Winners and Judges

2013 Competition

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ruel Johnson

Second Prize: Lesley-Ann Wanliss

Poetry:

First Prize: Vladimir Lucien

Second Prize: Ruel Johnson

Judges:

Short Fiction: Caryl Phillips, Olive Senior, Jan Lowe Shinebourne

Poetry: Easton Lee, Paul Keens-Douglas, Pam Mordecal

Past Winners and Judges

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Sharon Millar

Second Prize: Alexia Arthurs

Poetry:

First Prize: Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné

Second Prize: Lynn Sweeting

Judges:

Short Fiction: Thomas Glave, Oonya Kempadoo, Elizabeth Nunez

Poetry: Kendel Hippolyte, Mervyn Morris, Opal Palmer Adisa

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Barbara Jenkins

Second Prize: Heidi N. Holder

Poetry (two first place winners):

First Prize: Sonia Farmer and Danielle McShine

Judges:

Short Fiction: Erna Brodber, Zee Edgell, and Robert Antoni

Poetry: Fred D'Aguiar, Cyril Dabydeen, and Shara McCallum

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Stephen Narain

Second Prize: Andrea Shaw

Poetry:

First Prize: Lauren Alleyne
Second Prize: Ishion Hutchinson

 

Judges:

Short Fiction:Merle Hodge, Marlon James, and Shani Mootoo

Poetry: Kwame Dawes, Ramabai Espinet, and Kei Miller

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ashley Rousseau

Second Prize: Alake Pilgrim

Poetry:

First Prize: Monica Minott

Second Prize: Tanya Shirley

Judges:

Short Fiction: Garfield Ellis, Geoffrey Philp, and Merle Collins.

Poetry: Edward Baugh, Lorna Goodison, and Mark McWatt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interviews

Archive for February, 2011

Crossing the Bridge—An Interview with Tiphanie Yanique

Sunday, 27 February 2011

A. Naomi Jackson

Tiphanie Yanique is a fiction writer, poet, and essayist from St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Her collection of short stories, How to Escape from a Leper Colony, was published by Graywolf Press in March 2010. She was recently selected as one of National Book Foundation’s “5 under 35” and received the prestigious Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award. She is a professor of creative writing and Caribbean literature at Drew University. Last year, Yanique sat down with me for an interview over roti and mango juice in Flatbush on an early April day that teased with abundant sunshine followed by bone-chilling damp. We bonded over being two small-island women writers, and the children of both fiercely supportive grandmothers and mentally ill mothers. Only the bounds of the tape recorder limited the things that we had to talk about. (more…)