Winners and Judges

2013 Competition

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ruel Johnson

Second Prize: Lesley-Ann Wanliss

Poetry:

First Prize: Vladimir Lucien

Second Prize: Ruel Johnson

Judges:

Short Fiction: Caryl Phillips, Olive Senior, Jan Lowe Shinebourne

Poetry: Easton Lee, Paul Keens-Douglas, Pam Mordecal

Past Winners and Judges

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Sharon Millar

Second Prize: Alexia Arthurs

Poetry:

First Prize: Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné

Second Prize: Lynn Sweeting

Judges:

Short Fiction: Thomas Glave, Oonya Kempadoo, Elizabeth Nunez

Poetry: Kendel Hippolyte, Mervyn Morris, Opal Palmer Adisa

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Barbara Jenkins

Second Prize: Heidi N. Holder

Poetry (two first place winners):

First Prize: Sonia Farmer and Danielle McShine

Judges:

Short Fiction: Erna Brodber, Zee Edgell, and Robert Antoni

Poetry: Fred D'Aguiar, Cyril Dabydeen, and Shara McCallum

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Stephen Narain

Second Prize: Andrea Shaw

Poetry:

First Prize: Lauren Alleyne
Second Prize: Ishion Hutchinson

 

Judges:

Short Fiction:Merle Hodge, Marlon James, and Shani Mootoo

Poetry: Kwame Dawes, Ramabai Espinet, and Kei Miller

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ashley Rousseau

Second Prize: Alake Pilgrim

Poetry:

First Prize: Monica Minott

Second Prize: Tanya Shirley

Judges:

Short Fiction: Garfield Ellis, Geoffrey Philp, and Merle Collins.

Poetry: Edward Baugh, Lorna Goodison, and Mark McWatt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussions

Archive for the ‘Kelly Baker Josephs’ Category

sx salon, issue 16 (May 2014)

Wednesday, 9 July 2014

Introduction and Table of Contents

On the whole, our spring 2014 issue explores that indeterminate connection best named by Opal Palmer Adisa, in her short story “God’s Child,” as affinity. Such affinities are at times inexplicable, as in Adisa’s story wherein the speaker is drawn to a mystical madwoman, and at other times seemingly obvious, such as the intergenerational connection C. L. R. James feels with Toussaint Louverture. As many writers and scholars often do, James returns to what can be called an ongoing conversation with Toussaint in several of his writings. In this issue of sx salon, Raphael Dalleo, Jeremy Glick, and Laura Harris respond to the publication of James’s 1934 play, Toussaint Louverture, recently made available by editor Christian Høgsbjerg and Duke University Press. The three discussion articles, and the response from Høgsbjerg, consider what it means to have this conversation in dramatic form and what it means to have it available now, after decades of it being considered “lost.” How does this change our understanding of James? Of Toussaint? Of our own affinities—or lack thereof—with each figure?

Both James and Toussaint recur across this issue. The former is the focus of an interview Minkah Makalani conducts with James’s niece and nephew; the interview reveals a different caliber of affinity for James, the kind that supported him in intimate settings and enabled his more public work. And Andrew Daily’s review of Free and French in the Caribbean extends the fascination many intellectuals and writers feel for Toussaint. In some aspects, the other two reviews in this issue—Charmaine Crawford’s discussion of the already influential Sex and the Citizen and Jennifer Brittan’s reading of Eric Walrond: The Critical Heritage—are more about the disaffinities that accompany difference.

Rounding out sx salon 16 is poetry from Donna Aza Weir-Soley and Geoffrey Philp. Philp’s poem, “Letter from Marcus Garvey,” returns us to the idea of intergenerational affinity and reminds us of the ways we might speak our present to and through those who have walked before us.

As we move into summer, the Small Axe Project welcomes a new member of the sx salon editorial team: Vanessa K. Valdés, an assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese at City College, CUNY, joins us as book review editor. Please feel free to contact her at vkv@smallaxe.net about potential book reviews.

We hope you enjoy this issue (table of contents below).

Kelly Baker Josephs

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sx salon 16 (May 2014)

Introduction and Table of Contents—Kelly Baker Josephs

Reviews

Sex and the Citizen, edited by Faith Smith—Charmaine Crawford
Free and French in the Caribbean: Toussaint Louverture, Aimé Césaire, and Narratives of Loyal Opposition, by John Patrick Walsh—Andrew M. Daily
Eric Walrond: The Critical Heritage, edited by Louis Parascandola and Carl A. Wade—Jennifer Brittan

Discussion—Toussaint Louverture: The Story of the Only Successful Slave Revolt in History; A Play in Three Acts

Shifting the Geography of C. L. R. James Studies: Christian Høgsbjerg’s Toussaint Louverture—Raphael Dalleo
Paul Robeson as “Sporting Hero”—Jeremy Matthew Glick
Hero as Instrument—Laura Harris
Black Jacobinism, Black Bolshevism, and the British Stage—Christian Høgsbjerg

Poetry

Donna Aza Weir-Soley
Geoffrey Philp

Prose

Opal Palmer Adisa

Interview

“A Very Unusual People”: An Interview with Erica James and Henry James, Niece and Nephew of C. L. R James—Minkah Makalani

sx salon, issue 15 (February 2014)

Friday, 28 February 2014

Introduction and Table of Contents

Our first issue of 2014 tackles the concept of Chinese Caribbean literature with a special section of essays, interviews, and creative writing that approach this proposed literary category from different locations. Opening the discussion, Anne-Marie Lee-Loy asks the following “intrinsically intertwined” questions: “Is there such a thing as Chinese Caribbean literature? What would make such literature identifiably ‘Chinese Caribbean’?” And these questions haunt the other pieces in this issue’s special section.  In the two included interviews, Easton Lee speaks with Tzarina Prater about his early years and the influence they now have on his work while Patricia Powell discusses with Stephen Narain the curiosity that led her to writing The Pagoda, a novel that Lee-Loy notes troubles the impulse to constitute Chinese Caribbean literature by author origins. Powell reveals:

The novel grew out of a desire to know more about home, to know Jamaica’s history, to understand the Chinese experience in Jamaica, the complexities of otherness for them—people who are neither black nor white. I wanted to know their particular experiences of exile and immigration and displacement, their experiences of community and home there on the island.

These complexities arise in the two creative pieces in the special section, both of which return to the ubiquitous, though often overlooked, Mr. Chin character. While Victor Chang’s short story marries the unimaginable and the expected occurring on and to Mr. Chin’s property, Staceyann Chin’s poem to her father voices Mr. Chin’s progeny, the daughter now diasporic citizen who refuses to forget. Tao Leigh Goffe’s article closes the section with a consideration of six writers, including Staceyann Chin, who are “thrice diasporized,” that is, “shaped by the experiences of the African diaspora, the Asian diaspora, and the Caribbean diaspora.”

Via the writers included in this special section, this discussion seeks to not only contribute to but also complexify the slowly growing acknowledgement of a significant body of work from the Caribbean and the Caribbean diaspora.

Our issue also features five new book reviews as well as creative work from Cyril Dabydeen, Colin Robinson, Reuel Ben Lewi, and Rajiv Mohabir. The table of contents is included below.

This issue of sx salon is dedicated to the memory and legacy of Stuart Hall (3 February 1932–10 February 2014).

Kelly Baker Josephs

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sx salon 15 (February 2014)

Introduction and Table of Contents—Kelly Baker Josephs

Reviews

The Festival of the Wild Orchid by Ann-Margaret Lim—Leonora Simonovis-Brown
Light Falling on Bamboo by Lawrence Scott—Kaneesha Cherelle Parsard
Fault Lines by Kendel Hippolyte—Leanne Haynes
Archipelago: A Novel by Monique Roffey—Michael Sawyer
Postcolonial Odysseys: Derek Walcott’s Voyages of Homecoming by Maeve Tynan—Gyasi Byng

Discussion—Chinese Caribbean Literature

Identifying a Chinese Caribbean Literature: Pitfalls and Possibilities—Anne-Marie Lee-Loy
“Let Me Tell You How I Began”: A Conversation with Easton Lee—Tzarina T. Prater
Letter to My Father—Staceyann Chin
Mr. Chin’s Property—Victor Chang
(Re-)Constructing the Pagoda: A Conversation with Patricia Powell—Stephen Narain
Thrice Diasporized: The Emergence of Caribbean Chinese Diasporic Anglophone Literature—Tao Leigh Goffe

Prose

Cyril Dabydeen

Poetry

Colin Robinson
Reuel Ben Lewi
Rajiv Mohabir

sx salon 14 (November 2013)

Monday, 18 November 2013

Our fall issue of sx salon exhibits the variety of Caribbean cultural production. Our discussion section features an essay by poet and author Kei Miller on dub poetry and the “sort of life” it may continue to have in the diasporas. With an eye toward the element of home in the Caribbean diaspora, choreographer Chris Walker and poet Danez Smith blend word and dance as they ask what it means when home is no longer a safe place. Our third essay continues with the question of diaspora as Bernard James examines the tenuous and often fraught connections between Caribbean Americans and African Americans.

Our reviews in this issue are split between fiction and what we may sometimes wish to be fiction. Sandy Alenxandre introduces us to the first novel from Haitian American author Elsie Augustave, while Maja Horn reviews Junot Díaz’s return to Yunior in This Is How You Lose Her. Garfield Ellis reflects on “master storyteller” Anthony Winkler’s turn to historical fiction, with his signature humor. We also consider nonfictional narratives of history with Suzanne Uzzilia’s review of Sugar in the Blood, by Andrea Stuart, and Abolition and Plantation Management in Jamaica, 1807–1838, by Dave St. Aubyn Gosse. Bringing that narrative into the present, Taurean Webb discusses Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide by Hilary Beckles, to whom Geoffrey Philp dedicates his poem in this issue, “Busha Day Done.” We also feature poetry from emerging poets Kevin Browne and Enzo Silon Surin, as well as from well-known poet, writer, and activist Patrick Sylvain.

In our Poetry & Prose section we also announce the short list and winners for each category of the 2013 Small Axe Literary Competition. The winners of the 2013 competition:

  • In the Short Fiction category, first prize goes to Ruel Johnson and second prize to Lesley-Ann Wanliss.
  • In the Poetry category, first prize goes to Vladimir Lucien and second prize to Ruel Johnson.

Please join us in congratulating the writers and poets on our short list as well as our winners. We wish you all the best for the coming holidays and hope you enjoy this fall issue of sx salon (table of contents below).

Kelly Baker Josephs

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sx salon 14 (November 2013)

Introduction and Table of Contents—Kelly Baker Josephs

Reviews

God Carlos and The Family Mansion, by Anthony Winkler—Garfield Ellis
The Roving Tree, by Elsie Augustave—Sandy Alexandre
This Is How You Lose Her, by Junot Díaz—Maja Horn
Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide, by Hilary Beckles—Taurean Webb
Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire, by Andrea Stuart, and
Abolition and Plantation Management in Jamaica, 1807–1838, by Dave St Aubyn Gosse—Suzanne Uzzilia

Discussion articles

A Smaller Sound, a Lesser Fury: A Eulogy for Dub Poetry—Kei Miller
Facing Home, a Phobia: A Reflection on “In My Shadow”—Chris Walker, with Danez Smith
Fortifications for a Wobbly Bridge—Bernard James

Poetry

Patrick Sylvain
Kevin A. Browne
Enzo Silon Surin
Geoffrey Philp

sx salon 13 (August 2013)

Saturday, 24 August 2013

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

sx salon 12 (May 2013)

Monday, 27 May 2013

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

The Fiction of Independence

Monday, 11 February 2013

sx salon, issue 11 (February 2013)

Introduction and Table of Contents

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Adultery and Anticolonialism

Monday, 11 February 2013

The Pleasures of Independence Literature

Kelly Baker Josephs

In the poem “Hope Gardens,” Lorna Goodison writes of the disjuncture between what a would-be poet learns in a seminar led by a postcolonial scholar and what she remembers of Hope Gardens in Kingston. Listening to the scholar reveal “plot / after heinous imperial plot buried behind / our botanical gardens,” the speaker can remember only the delights of picture taking, sky gazing, daydreaming in the gardens. Charming memories that inspire her to memorialize the gardens in verse; but this verse, and the pleasures it aims to record, is threatened by the scholar’s revelations about the pervasiveness of colonial power. Goodison closes the poem:

We the ignorant, the uneducated, unaware

That the roses we assumed bloomed just
to full eye were representative of English
lady beauty; unenlightened we were, so we

picked them on the sly to give as token
to the love we got lost in the maze with—
quick thief a kiss—and this colonial design

was nowhere in mind or sight; but even if
and so what?[1]

Goodison’s poem raises more than some simple question of ignorance being bliss. She pits pleasure against postcolonial enlightenment. Though she focuses on gardens here, I take her words as an opening to my discussion of pleasure to be found in Caribbean fiction published in the 1960s, the era of independence in the anglophone islands. (more…)

sx salon, issue 10 (August 2012)

Friday, 31 August 2012

Introduction and Table of Contents

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sx salon, issue 9 (May 2012)

Monday, 28 May 2012

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

sx salon, issue 8 (February 2012)

Saturday, 25 February 2012

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)