Winners and Judges

2013 Competition

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ruel Johnson

Second Prize: Lesley-Ann Wanliss

Poetry:

First Prize: Vladimir Lucien

Second Prize: Ruel Johnson

Judges:

Short Fiction: Caryl Phillips, Olive Senior, Jan Lowe Shinebourne

Poetry: Easton Lee, Paul Keens-Douglas, Pam Mordecal

Past Winners and Judges

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Sharon Millar

Second Prize: Alexia Arthurs

Poetry:

First Prize: Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné

Second Prize: Lynn Sweeting

Judges:

Short Fiction: Thomas Glave, Oonya Kempadoo, Elizabeth Nunez

Poetry: Kendel Hippolyte, Mervyn Morris, Opal Palmer Adisa

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Barbara Jenkins

Second Prize: Heidi N. Holder

Poetry (two first place winners):

First Prize: Sonia Farmer and Danielle McShine

Judges:

Short Fiction: Erna Brodber, Zee Edgell, and Robert Antoni

Poetry: Fred D'Aguiar, Cyril Dabydeen, and Shara McCallum

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Stephen Narain

Second Prize: Andrea Shaw

Poetry:

First Prize: Lauren Alleyne
Second Prize: Ishion Hutchinson

 

Judges:

Short Fiction:Merle Hodge, Marlon James, and Shani Mootoo

Poetry: Kwame Dawes, Ramabai Espinet, and Kei Miller

 

Winners:

Short Fiction:

First Prize: Ashley Rousseau

Second Prize: Alake Pilgrim

Poetry:

First Prize: Monica Minott

Second Prize: Tanya Shirley

Judges:

Short Fiction: Garfield Ellis, Geoffrey Philp, and Merle Collins.

Poetry: Edward Baugh, Lorna Goodison, and Mark McWatt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussions

Archive for the ‘Kelly Baker Josephs’ Category

sx salon, issue 17 (October 2014)

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Introduction and Table of Contents

In this issue of sx salon, we have the pleasure of publishing a discussion section on Caribbean film archives, guest-edited by Terri Francis. Francis explains the impetus behind bringing together scholars such as Cara Caddoo, Sean Metzer, Rachel Moseley-Wood, and Chi-ming Yang to discuss the topic:

I wanted to read about Caribbean film in ways I had not seen yet or do not hear about enough. Because film sits between the commercial and the artisanal, exploitative and expressive, we need film study of the Caribbean that takes account of such vicissitudes. With this collection we begin the work of not only recovering but also reimagining the parameters of the missing archives of the Caribbean’s transnational history with motion pictures.

The discussion ranges across various connections in Caribbean film production that deserve much more study—between the Caribbean and early black cinema, between the Chinese Caribbean and blockbuster film, between environmentalism and nationalism—and those that seem individual to a single filmmaker, in this case, Richard Fung, but reverberate across the field of Caribbean film studies. Together these essays offer exploratory steps into what Francis terms the “missing archives” of Caribbean film history.

Also included in this issue are reviews of three novels and of the fortieth-anniversary edition of the seminal tome The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History. This new and expanded edition, reviewed by Vanessa K. Valdés, includes originally unpublished material that updates the sourcebook for twenty-first-century readers, with commentary on such issues as the growth and changing geography of the Puerto Rican diaspora. Our three articles on newly published novels include Kristina Huang’s review of David Dabydeen historical novel Johnson’s Dictionary; Sophie Harris’s review of Amanda Smyth’s psychologically tangled A Kind of Eden; and Natasha Gordon-Chipembere’s review of the much anticipated, and much discussed, Claire of the Sea Light by Edwidge Danticat.

In the poetry and prose section of this issue, we present new poems from Arturo Desimone and Reuel Lewi, with our first flash fiction piece; we are pleased to feature work from Neala Bhagwansingh as our first venture into this new genre of fiction. Closing out our October issue is an in-depth interview with Curdella Forbes, the fourth in Sheryl Gifford’s series on female scholars.

This issue marks our move to a thrice-per-year publishing schedule. Our issues will now be available in February, June, and October. We will, however, be back in November to announce the winners of this year’s Small Axe Literary Competition.

We hope you enjoy this issue (table of contents below).

Kelly Baker Josephs

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sx salon 17 (October 2014)

Introduction and Table of Contents—Kelly Baker Josephs

Reviews

The Puerto Ricans: A Documentary History, edited by Kal Wagenheim and Olga Jiménez de Wagenheim—Vanessa K. Valdés
Johnson’s Dictionary, by David Dabydeen—Kristina Huang
A Kind of Eden, by Amanda Smyth—Sophie Harris
Claire of the Sea Light, by Edwidge Danticat—Natasha Gordon-Chipembere

Discussion: Caribbean Film Archives

Unexpected Archives: Seeking More Locations of Caribbean Film—Terri Francis
Circuits of Exchange: The Caribbean in Early Black Cinema Culture—Cara Caddoo
Chineseness in Caribbean Cinema—Sean Metzer
Unbinding Identities: The Challenges to Nationalism’s Myths in Jamaica for Sale—Rachel Moseley-Wood
Food as Cinematic Archive: A Conversation with Richard Fung—Chi-ming Yang

Poetry

Arturo Desimone      
Reuel Lewi

Prose

Neala Bhagwansingh

Interview

“A Community of the Self”: A Conversation with Curdella Forbes—Sheryl Gifford

sx salon, issue 16 (May 2014)

Wednesday, 9 July 2014

Introduction and Table of Contents (more…)

sx salon, issue 15 (February 2014)

Friday, 28 February 2014

Introduction and Table of Contents (more…)

sx salon 14 (November 2013)

Monday, 18 November 2013

Our fall issue of sx salon exhibits the variety of Caribbean cultural production. Our discussion section features an essay by poet and author Kei Miller on dub poetry and the “sort of life” it may continue to have in the diasporas. With an eye toward the element of home in the Caribbean diaspora, choreographer Chris Walker and poet Danez Smith blend word and dance as they ask what it means when home is no longer a safe place. Our third essay continues with the question of diaspora as Bernard James examines the tenuous and often fraught connections between Caribbean Americans and African Americans.

Our reviews in this issue are split between fiction and what we may sometimes wish to be fiction. Sandy Alenxandre introduces us to the first novel from Haitian American author Elsie Augustave, while Maja Horn reviews Junot Díaz’s return to Yunior in This Is How You Lose Her. Garfield Ellis reflects on “master storyteller” Anthony Winkler’s turn to historical fiction, with his signature humor. We also consider nonfictional narratives of history with Suzanne Uzzilia’s review of Sugar in the Blood, by Andrea Stuart, and Abolition and Plantation Management in Jamaica, 1807–1838, by Dave St. Aubyn Gosse. Bringing that narrative into the present, Taurean Webb discusses Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide by Hilary Beckles, to whom Geoffrey Philp dedicates his poem in this issue, “Busha Day Done.” We also feature poetry from emerging poets Kevin Browne and Enzo Silon Surin, as well as from well-known poet, writer, and activist Patrick Sylvain.

In our Poetry & Prose section we also announce the short list and winners for each category of the 2013 Small Axe Literary Competition. The winners of the 2013 competition:

  • In the Short Fiction category, first prize goes to Ruel Johnson and second prize to Lesley-Ann Wanliss.
  • In the Poetry category, first prize goes to Vladimir Lucien and second prize to Ruel Johnson.

Please join us in congratulating the writers and poets on our short list as well as our winners. We wish you all the best for the coming holidays and hope you enjoy this fall issue of sx salon (table of contents below).

Kelly Baker Josephs

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sx salon 14 (November 2013)

Introduction and Table of Contents—Kelly Baker Josephs

Reviews

God Carlos and The Family Mansion, by Anthony Winkler—Garfield Ellis
The Roving Tree, by Elsie Augustave—Sandy Alexandre
This Is How You Lose Her, by Junot Díaz—Maja Horn
Britain’s Black Debt: Reparations for Caribbean Slavery and Native Genocide, by Hilary Beckles—Taurean Webb
Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire, by Andrea Stuart, and
Abolition and Plantation Management in Jamaica, 1807–1838, by Dave St Aubyn Gosse—Suzanne Uzzilia

Discussion articles

A Smaller Sound, a Lesser Fury: A Eulogy for Dub Poetry—Kei Miller
Facing Home, a Phobia: A Reflection on “In My Shadow”—Chris Walker, with Danez Smith
Fortifications for a Wobbly Bridge—Bernard James

Poetry

Patrick Sylvain
Kevin A. Browne
Enzo Silon Surin
Geoffrey Philp

sx salon 13 (August 2013)

Saturday, 24 August 2013

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

sx salon 12 (May 2013)

Monday, 27 May 2013

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

The Fiction of Independence

Monday, 11 February 2013

sx salon, issue 11 (February 2013)

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

Adultery and Anticolonialism

Monday, 11 February 2013

The Pleasures of Independence Literature

Kelly Baker Josephs

In the poem “Hope Gardens,” Lorna Goodison writes of the disjuncture between what a would-be poet learns in a seminar led by a postcolonial scholar and what she remembers of Hope Gardens in Kingston. Listening to the scholar reveal “plot / after heinous imperial plot buried behind / our botanical gardens,” the speaker can remember only the delights of picture taking, sky gazing, daydreaming in the gardens. Charming memories that inspire her to memorialize the gardens in verse; but this verse, and the pleasures it aims to record, is threatened by the scholar’s revelations about the pervasiveness of colonial power. Goodison closes the poem:

We the ignorant, the uneducated, unaware

That the roses we assumed bloomed just
to full eye were representative of English
lady beauty; unenlightened we were, so we

picked them on the sly to give as token
to the love we got lost in the maze with—
quick thief a kiss—and this colonial design

was nowhere in mind or sight; but even if
and so what?[1]

Goodison’s poem raises more than some simple question of ignorance being bliss. She pits pleasure against postcolonial enlightenment. Though she focuses on gardens here, I take her words as an opening to my discussion of pleasure to be found in Caribbean fiction published in the 1960s, the era of independence in the anglophone islands. (more…)

sx salon, issue 10 (August 2012)

Friday, 31 August 2012

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)

sx salon, issue 9 (May 2012)

Monday, 28 May 2012

Introduction and Table of Contents

(more…)